Depression, Anxiety, suicidal thoughts

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Mood Disorders

People experience a wide variety of emotions throughout their lifetime and many things can impact how we feel. Experiencing losses in life, the birth of a child, multiple deployments overseas, moving across the country and job promotions are just a few. At times, we can begin to feel depressed, on edge, worried all the time and stressed out, and emotions can become unmanageable and out of control. When emotions begin to become more intense and not go away, this can cause concern that something is wrong.

Depressive Disorders

Moods are often explained in terms of extremes or poles (think of the North and South Poles on our planet). Ongoing sadness, significant changes in eating or sleeping patterns, difficulty concentrating, hopelessness, worry, and even feelings of guilt that are difficult to make sense of are signs of possible Unipolar mood, or Major Depression.

Bipolar mood, formally Bipolar Disorder, is usually experienced as riding a "roller coaster of emotions," from high to low. Symptoms include some of the depression symptoms mentioned above, as well as times of endless amounts of energy, difficulty thinking clearly, beginning but often not completing projects or tasks, feeling increased anxiety that cannot always be explained, and feeling and acting more impulsively (spending money on major purchases, acting out sexually or drinking.) Some of the symptoms can last a few days, a few weeks, and sometimes several months.

What is important to know is that you are not alone in experiencing mood issues. Many people have been where you are, and many have been able to recover. Reaching out for support by choosing from a wide variety of options is the first step. Here are a few ideas:
Do your own research at NAMI.org.

There is hope and there is help! Give yourself the gift of healing. You deserve it.

  • Do your own research at NAMI.org. This resource will start your journey of understanding and feeling supported in an anonymous way. Knowledge is power.
  • Talk to someone you know who has experienced a mood disorder and has gotten better. You will receive the acceptance and understanding of someone who’s been in your shoes.
  • Contact a medical or counseling professional that can offer an even greater understanding of what is happening, which can often be at least partially explained by a biological imbalance.

There is hope and there is help! Give yourself the gift of healing. You deserve it.

Below are links to websites for more information about how you may be feeling and things you can do to take action.

Anxiety

Feeling restless, fidgety, "keyed up", full of worry? Like your "stomach is in knots" or feeling "stressed" all the time? The impact of daily life and responsibilities can cause these types of feelings, which are sometimes described as feeling anxious or having anxiety. They can also be the result of experiencing some sort of neglect or trauma, recently or in the past.

Anxiety disorders can range from constant feelings of panic, panic attacks, phobias or specific fears, having obsessive thoughts or compulsive behaviors, to feeling generally anxious about anything and everything. Symptoms of anxiety can affect thinking, emotions, behaviors, and can sometimes even present as physical symptoms perceived as a medical issue. Self-care and coping skills sometimes help but, despite our best efforts, sometimes they don't. When these uncomfortable feelings do not go away and cause disruption, it is time to seek assistance.It is important to know that you are not alone and there is help available for anxiety issues. Many people have been where you are, and many have been able to recover. Reaching out for support by choosing from a wide variety of options is the first step. Here are a few ideas:

Do your own research at NAMI.org. This resource will start your journey of understanding and feeling supported in an anonymous way. Knowledge is power.
Talk to someone you know who has experienced anxiety issues and has gotten better. You will receive the acceptance and understanding of someone who's been in your shoes.
Contact a medical or counseling professional that can offer an even greater understanding of what is happening, which can often be at least partially explained by a biological imbalance.

Below are links to websites for more information:

If you feel you are in crisis, please do not wait...call and speak to a crisis counselor by contacting one of the crisis lines below. If you feel you are in immediate danger, go to your local Emergency Room or call 911.

Lake County 24-hour Crisis Line: 847-377-8088

National Crisis Hotline for Service Members, Veterans and Families:

1-800-273-TALK (8255), Press "1" to speak with a veteran.

Try the PTSD Coach Mobile App: Click Here

If you are not in crisis, but want to learn more about these issues, contact us at one of our offices:

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   Call: 847-986-4622

Text Messaging to Prevent Suicide

Veterans and troops in crisis—and their friends and families—may text free of charge to the VA's Veterans Crisis Line at 83-8255 to receive immediate and confidential support. The text service is available, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and connects a user with a specially trained VA professional—many who are veterans themselves.